Hard words: Condescending and mansplaining.

In my opinion, any language is a living tool that reflects the current culture and mindset of its native speakers.
There is a well-known anecdote about 50 words to describe snow in Aleuts language, which is actually a myth. But anyway any language follow the society needs and adapts in no time.

I am going to write a series of the posts about words that are interesting for me. (Even though whatever I want to write a series I always fail).
There are many reasons why language adapts, for instance
– When you prohibit people call a spade a spade, they have to invent a new way to use the same notion, “person of color” for example.
– Sometimes people have to create new words just to please some group. The vast amount of invented feminitives is a good example.
Politcorrectness and feminism are two mainstreams in U.S. society as it seems to me, that’s why they must have the significant impact on the language.

I want to illustrate both my today’s words with two short videos.
First one from a brilliant show Silicon Valey.

Actually, in it, Erlich mentioned both my chosen words mansplaining and condensing.
I’ve never heard the second one in a live dialogue before we started to discuss the appropriate form of giving your opinion for code-review on my job.
I didn’t understand it at first, so I had to google it and run into another video.

But the problem with the video for me that it marked “wrong” behavior but not presenting the right one. That’s why I have a few questions for you.

– How would you continue the last video? Give me the right way of saying “you were supposed to have known this and that if you came here.”, please.

– Is there a mirrored word for Mansplaining? Something for marking a process when a woman explain something to a man, and he is already aware of it.

– Why do we need a particular word to label the gender of a speaking person? As far as I know, we use “tell” and “say” with “mantell” and “womensay”, what is the difference with the previous case?

3 comments

  1. Legend:  Deleted  Inserted (or moved)  Comment

    In my opinion, any language is a living tool that reflects the current culture and mindset of its native speakers. There is a well-known anecdote about the Aleuts language having 50 words just to describe snow in Aleuts language, but this which is actually a myth. But Anyway, any language follows its the society's needs and adapts over in no time. 

    I am going to write a series of the posts about words that are interesting to for me. (Even though whenever whatever I want to write a series, I always fail.)  There are many reasons why languages adapts, for instance,

    • When you prohibit people from calling a spade a spade, they have to invent a new way to use the same notion, a “person of color” for example.
       
    • Sometimes people have to create new words just to please some group. The vast amount of invented feminitives (I've never heard this word) is a good example.

    Political correctness and feminism are two mainstreams in U.S. society as it seems to me.  That’s why they must have a the significant impact on the language.  (Do you mean "on English" or "on any language"?)

  2. Legend:  Deleted  Inserted (or moved)  Comment

    I want to illustrate both my today’s words with two short videos.  The first one from a brilliant show called "Silicon Valley"Actually, In it, Erlich mentioned both my chosen words: mansplaining and condescendingI had I’ve never heard the second word one in a live dialogue before my company we started to discussing the appropriate way to give form of giving your opinion on a for code review at on my job.  I didn’t understand the meaning of condescending it at first, so I had to google it and watch run into another video.

    But the problem with the second video for me that it demonstrated marked “wrong” behavior but did not presenting "correct" behavior the right one. That’s why I have a few questions for you.

  3. Legend:  Deleted  Inserted (or moved)  Comment

    • How would you continue the last video? Give me the right way of saying “you were expected to know supposed to have known this and that basic knowledge before if you even came here.”  Please. (or "Puh-lease.")
       
    • Is there a corresponding (or counterpart) mirrored word for "mansplaining" that describes ? Something for marking a process when a woman condescendingly explains something to a man that, and he is already aware of it?
       
    • Why do we need a particular word to label the gender of the a person speaking person? As far as I know, we use “tell” and “say” with “mantell” (I've never heard this word) and “womensay” (I've never heard this word), what is the difference with the previous case?

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